Team Austria wins 2013 Solar Decathlon with LISI House

Team Austria wins 2013 Solar Decathlon with LISI House

Team Austria won the 2013 Solar Decathlon with the LISI House that combines sustainable living with technology solutions for low energy consumption.

The University of Las Vegas Nevada took second place in the overall competition, and Czech Technical University received third place.

The Living Inspired by Sustainable Innovation or LISI house is designed to generate more power than it uses over the course of a year. The house adapts to a range of climate zones and flexes to meet a variety of lifestyles.

The winner of the Solar Decathlon is the team that best blends affordability, consumer appeal, and design excellence with optimal energy production and maximum efficiency.

The team from the University of Vienna, competing in the U.S. for the first time, consistently impressed juries with the LISI house, after winning first place in the Communications Contest, tying for second place in Market Appeal, and tying for third place in Engineering. In measured contests, Team Austria received first place in both the Hot Water and Energy Balance contests.

Watch team members describe the LISI home and the design philosophy behind it.

Sustainable building features

  • Renewable and eco-friendly construction and insulation materials made of timber are easily transported and provide indoor climate comfort and carbon-neutrality.
  • Changeable architectural elements create a variety of sensory conditions—closing to form a protective cocoon for occupants and opening to allow them to expand their space.
  • Two patios create a balance between interior and exterior and public and semi-public spaces.
  • The passive solar design, combined with an automated screen and awning system, provides shade to keep the living spaces cool and comfortable.
  • A patio herb garden draws water from a rainwater reservoir.
  • Generous storage, completely integrated into the walls, frees the primary indoor space from clutter.

Technologies

  • Photovoltaic modules provide an annual surplus, which can be used to power electric bikes or vehicles.
  • A centralized utility room contains all the automated mechanical systems the house needs, including a photovoltaics monitor, ventilation, plumbing, and hot water supply.
  • Two high-efficiency, air-water heat pumps supply cold and hot water for space heating and cooling as well as for domestic hot water.
  • An energy-recovery ventilation unit acts as a heat and humidity exchanger between exhaust air and fresh intake air to keep the living spaces comfortable and healthy.
  • A multifunctional subfloor system regulates the indoor climate using water, air, and active cubic capacity.
  • A heat-recovering shower tray reduces the energy demand for hot water by almost one-third.
  • Through a tablet application, the automated house control hub, energy performance history, and live data can be accessed in an intuitive way. 

The 2013 People's Choice Award went to the UrbanEden, the solar-powered house from The University of North Carolina at Charlotte.

The U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon is an award-winning program that challenges collegiate teams to design, build, and operate solar-powered houses that are cost-effective, energy-efficient, and attractive. The winner of the competition is the team that best blends affordability, consumer appeal, and design excellence with optimal energy production and maximum efficiency.

The first Solar Decathlon was held in 2002; the competition has since occurred biennially in 2005, 2007, 2009, and 2011.

(Photo Credit: Jason Flakes/U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon)

Read more about building green


Topics: Building Green, GREAT GREEN HOMES, Photovoltaic / Solar Panels, Solar Power, Sustainability Trends & Statistics, Trends / Statistics

Companies: U.S. Department of Energy


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