Improve indoor air quality with fabric and rug choices

| by Touseef Hussain
Improve indoor air quality with fabric and rug choices

It would surprise many homeowners to know that the indoor air quality of their home could indeed be worse than that of the outdoors. That's right, indoor air is not as protective and clean as you might have once thought. Whether it be your most loved piece of furniture, the big screen television or the beautiful plush rug, they're all suspect when it comes to keeping your home pollution free. Take these steps to improve the indoor air quality of your home today.

Choose natural fibers

Carpets and rugs are the perfect trap for dust and where there is dust built up there is room for dust-mites which have been implicated in triggering asthma. When it comes to brand new carpets, these have been found to contain a whole gamut of pollutants from fire retardant treatments through to pesticides!

Now is the time to change your floor coverings to those constructed of natural organic fibers. Both organic cotton and organic wool are excellent choices over synthetic materials such as polyester and nylon. And when it comes time to cleaning your carpets and rugs, opt for steam cleaning rather than dry cleaning or other treatments that use toxins. Better still, encourage visitors and all members of the household to remove their shoes when inside, that way you will reduce the amount of bacteria and grime from outdoors from taking hold in your rugs.

Optimum interior fabric

For anyone seeking cleaner indoor air, fabrics such as vinyl and polyvinyl chloride, better known as PVC, are best avoided. Look for fabrics that boast formaldehyde-free and low toxic emissions, organic and recycled fabrics as well as those options that utilize non-toxic inks that are water-based. Thanks to many fabulous fabric designers who focus solely on producing eco-friendly fabrics, you don't have to sacrifice interior style to gain improved indoor air. From organic cotton velvet through to eco-silk, you'll be pleasantly surprised at just how wonderful your home can look at the same time as bringing better health to all members of the household.

Let the air in

It might seem counterintuitive but letting in the outside air is an excellent way to freshen up your home and improve the quality of the air inside. Of course, if a six lane highway is at your front door, or a particularly toxic factory, then you're better off keeping the house closed up. However, in the main, even those people living in busy cities would do well to let the outside air in.

Avoid air fresheners

As tempting as all those home air fresheners are try to avoid them completely. Instead, add fresh flowers to your home and for particularly strong odours place a container of baking soda in the room and let it perform its natural ability to soak up smells. Like air fresheners, perfumes and other products that contain scents are best avoided as they likely contain many chemicals that could cause allergies.

Given how much time we spend indoors these days, it's imperative that we clean up our indoor air quality to improve our health and the health of our children. When we do that not only do we improve the quality of our lives but we also help the environment, and without that there's nothing. So take the time today to change over your fabrics and rugs to improve the indoor air quality of your home.


Topics: Indoor Air Quality



Touseef Hussain
Touseef Hussain, through his job at QS Supplies, is a creative writer and an interior design consultant, who currently lives in United Kingdom, Leicester. Tauseef along with QS Supplies has handled many interior design projects all over UK. He has written blogs and articles on several home improvement topics and has offered several creative and valuable ideas through his articles. His main goal is to help people spend less and live more. www

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