The biggest sustainability trends in design for 2012

| by Touseef Hussain
The biggest sustainability trends in design for 2012

Before we know it we will be welcoming in the new year and embarking on freshsustainability trends. What those trends will be and which ones will be truly popular is yet to be seen, but what we do know is that in 2012 we saw many sustainable design trends that were embraced with much enthusiasm. Indeed, with energy costs draining household budgets as well as the world's resources, it's little wonder that consumers sought out with gusto green design alternatives! So what were the biggest sustainability trends in design for 2012?

Taking back the power

In 2012 we saw a groundswell of consumers take control of their household energy costs by way of a variety of techniques. One popular activity was that of individuals installing energy usage equipment to determine which appliances in the home were using the most power and then attempting to reduce the associated costs. Entire households initiated new ways of living in an attempt to bring down their energy bills and subsequently reduce their impact on the environment. Measuring devices revealed to many households that their outdated appliances were extremely power hungry and this led to them replacing them with more eco-friendly options. It's now commonplace for residents to incorporate energy usage equipment into their home interiors.

Clever choices

No matter whether home owners viewed renovating and redecorating as a pleasure or a chore, in 2012 one of the big trends was people choosing to makeover their homes for the sake of their health and the environment. With such a persistent focus in 2012 for households to reduce their energy consumption, it stands to reason that practical and green choices were the most popular designs. Eco-friendly flooring and paint were a big hit and consumers increasingly turned their noses up at products that came up short in the green stakes. Environmentally sound materials in the form of bamboo and cork are just two of the many alternative options people sought after. It is without doubt that both the environment and health were a major focus for consumers in 2012.

Less is more

The minimalist trend has been strong for several years now and 2012 was no different, indeed living with less is showing no signs of letting up. We propose that the sheer simplicity of this trend is what makes it ever popular. Consumers understand how more energy efficient homes, smaller living quarters and less consumption directly translates to a smaller footprint on the planet and even makes life more simple and enjoyable. Engaging energy audit experts and sustainable living design consultants has become the norm for home owners who insist on learning ways to save money and the planet. From moving windows right through to installing solar panels, 2012 was a year where efficient and sustainable design trends were incorporated into more and more homes.

As consumer demand continues to grow, industry responds by incorporating green solutions into their offers. With sustainable living now well and truly in the mainstream, it's no longer a question of whether there will be any new sustainable design trends for the future, but rather a question of what those new trends will be for 2013 and beyond, and that's certainly good news for the environment.


Topics: Going Green, Paint | Low VOC and No VOC, Solar Power, Windows



Touseef Hussain
Touseef Hussain, through his job at QS Supplies, is a creative writer and an interior design consultant, who currently lives in United Kingdom, Leicester. Tauseef along with QS Supplies has handled many interior design projects all over UK. He has written blogs and articles on several home improvement topics and has offered several creative and valuable ideas through his articles. His main goal is to help people spend less and live more. www

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