2 Seattle homes among world's first to achieve zero energy certification

2 Seattle homes among world's first to achieve zero energy certification

(Above) Cork Hause. (Below) Emerald Star. Photos by Tucker English

Two Seattle homes are among the world’s most sustainable.

Emerald Star and Cork Haus have received zero energy certifications from the International Living Future Institute as part of its Zero Energy Building certification program, according to a release.

The homes were developed by Dwell Development, a leading sustainable home builder in Seattle.

The homes are the second and third residential projects in the city to be certified by ILFI; and the 10th and 11th projects in the world, the release said. 

The program recognizes the world’s most energy-efficient buildings, including both commercial and residential projects. One of the program’s most notable projects is the Bullitt Center — the greenest commercial building in the world and the headquarters for the International Living Future Institute in Seattle. 

The Emerald Star project in the Puget Sound combines green technology, renewables and reclaimed materials to help the 2,218-square-foot home meet the rigorous requirements for certification.

Certification requires achieving net zero energy using a renewable source, such as solar, 70 percent reduction in water use, 90 percent reclaimed or Forest Stewardship Council (FSC)-certified wood materials and exceptional indoor air quality. 

Completed in 2015, the project exceeded expectations and net-zero energy use. Recent data from Built Green shows the home produced 3,941 kWh more renewable energy than it consumed over a 25-month period. The homeowners, a family of three, also used just 19.95 gallons of utility-supplied water per person per day, which is a 70 percent reduction in water use compared to the national average of 67 gallons per person per day. 

The project also gained national attention for being named the grand winner in the U.S. Department of Energy’s 2016 Housing Innovation Awards. 

Net-zero energy building certification from the International Living Future Institute is based on proven performance data (as opposed to an energy model), which is gathered over 12 consecutive months. 

Cork Haus, named for the home’s eco-friendly cork siding, was the first speculative home in Seattle to achieve HERS-1 certification. The vigorous combination of Passive House standards, recycled materials and solar technology help the 1,711-square-foot home achieve net positive energy usage. 

Cork Haus is the third residence certified under the Zero Energy program in Seattle and the 11th residence certified in the world. 

In addition to the zero energy certifications from the International Living Future Institute, Dwell Development’s Genesee Park project was the first home to receive the net-zero label from Built Green. 

 


Topics: Building Green, Certification / LEED, Solar Power, Water Saving Devices


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