Spray foam insulation helps homes with allergy and asthma prone occupants

June 6, 2014

Because average Americans spend 90 percent of their time indoors, indoor air quality should be high on their list of priorities.

To help those people with allergies or asthma, a tight building envelope can keep out external triggers and spray foam insulation helps make for a well-sealed home.

Clean Crawls, a Seattle-based crawl space cleanout and attic insulation company, explained how spray foam insulation is the best choice for those prone to asthma attacks or with sensitive allergies.

The experts at Clean Crawls say that spray foam insulation is the best choice for those sensitive to allergens from other types of insulation, which can also exacerbate asthma symptoms.

According to Clean Crawls, Spray foam insulation can work wonders at keeping allergens out of your home, such as mold, dust, carbon monoxide, pollen, and moisture.

Other types of insulation, such as fiberglass, cellulose, and cotton, can worsen allergic reactions and asthma symptoms. Ultimately, they conclude that spray foam insulation is the best choice for those who struggle with sensitivity to various allergens.

In general, any form of insulation can be considered safe as long as it is completely sealed off from the rest of the house. Because this is difficult to do when air can seep through walls, ceilings and floors, carrying allergenic particles with it, spray foam insulation is definitely the safest option.

If fiberglass, cellulose, or cotton insulation gets damp or wet from moisture condensation, it can easily begin to grow mold. Not only does this mean that the occupants are susceptible to dangerous mycotoxins that float through the air, but the insulation should be replaced and adequate vapor barriers installed.

The Clean Crawls article encourages homeowners to take control of their crawl space. "If your crawl space or attic insulation is causing you to sneeze, we would urge you to consider spray foam insulation as an effective solution to your allergy problem."

Read more about insulation.


Topics: Going Green, Healthy Homes, Indoor Air Quality, Insulation, Ventilation


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